Tag Archives: hygiene

What’s proper period hygiene?


Proper Period Hygiene

With all the frustration that comes with your monthly period, here are some easy period hygiene tips to keep your vagina healthy and happy.

Why is period hygiene so important?

Although your period is natural, it can cause problems for you if you don’t have a good hygiene routine. Proper period hygiene prevents infections, irritations and creates a healthy vaginal environment. Lack of proper period hygiene can lead to common issues such as urinary tract infections and yeast infections.

Preparing for your period

Your period can be unpredictable at times. A great way to keep your period on schedule and reduce cramping is getting on birth control. One of the many perks of birth control is preventing pregnancy.

Stay prepared by downloading a period app. Period apps can predict your periods and tell you when you’re most likely to get pregnant. Packing extra pads, tampons and pain medicine can save you and your friends lots of worry and embarrassment.

Easy tips to remember when it comes to period hygiene

  • Use unscented products
  • Change your pad every 3-4 hours depending on flow
  • Change your tampon every 5-7 hours depending on flow
  • Use warm water to clean the vaginal area (only use soap for inner thighs)
  • Don’t use perfumes, scented products or douches

Go to a doctor if:

  • You need to change your pad or tampon every hour
  • Your cramps are not getting better even with pain medicine
  • You notice blood in your urine, you need to urinate often or if it burns when you urinate
  • You have vaginal irritation and itchiness

Your body will go through many changes on your journey to adulthood. Getting your period is a natural part of maturing. This particular change could make you feel lost, dirty or ashamed but with the help of our proper period hygiene tips you can feel fresh and clean all day.

Learn more about periods and period hygiene:

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Know about the flow – menstrual cups


The first time you get your period can feel awkward or embarrassing—but it’s actually a very normal thing, and the more you know about it, the less awkward you’ll feel

We’re posting a three-part series called ‘Know About the Flow,’ where we’ll shed some light on sanitary products that young women can use to stay fresh and clean every month … and today is all about menstrual cups!

What are Menstrual Cups?

A menstrual cup is a small, rubbery cup that’s inserted in your vagina like a tampon. It doesn’t come with an applicator, but with practice, you’ll be able to insert it easily. Menstrual cups collect blood and can be removed, cleaned and used again.

How Do I Wear a Menstrual Cup?

Since menstrual cups are placed by hand, the first thing you should always do is to wash your hands. When you read the directions that your menstrual cup comes with, you’ll learn a couple different ways of inserting it. Give yourself time and be patient when trying these techniques, and focus on the method that works best for you.

If your menstrual cup is placed properly, you won’t be able to feel it inside you. If you place the cup and can feel it poking or sticking out, just take it out and try again.

When and How do I Remove Menstrual Cups?

Many menstrual cup manufacturers recommend removing and cleaning your menstrual cup at least every 12 hours. On your heavier days, though, you’ll need to remove and replace the menstrual cup more frequently.

You’ll need to be in the bathroom when removing your menstrual cup. To remove it, first wash your hands, then place your fingers inside your vagina, grasp the base of the cup, and gently pull down. You may even pinch the bottom of the cup to release the suction. Pull the cup out and tip the collected blood into the toilet. You’ll then rinse out the cup (if it’s reusable) or throw it away (if it’s disposable). As always, be sure to wash your hands after handling your cup.

Want to learn about other options to stay clean during your period? Check out other posts about pads and tampons!

Or for more information, take a look at the following websites:

Know about the flow – tampons


The first time you get your period can feel awkward or embarrassing—but it’s actually a very normal thing, and the more you know about it, the less awkward you’ll feel.

We’re posting a three-part series called ‘Know About the Flow,’ where we’ll shed some light on sanitary products that young women can use to stay fresh and clean every month … and today is all about tampons!

What Are Tampons?

A tampon is made of cotton (or a blend of cotton and rayon) and has a string attached to it. You wear the tampon inside of your body in your vagina, where it absorbs blood as it flows down through your vagina. Tampons come in various sizes that you can use depending on how heavy your blood flow is, and they can come with or without applicators to help you place the tampon in your vagina.

How Do I Wear a Tampon?

Each tampon box comes with instructions on how to put in, or insert, the tampon. The instructions show pictures of how the tampon looks inside your body. Take a few minutes to read over the instructions, and give yourself time to practice a few times. It helps to use a tampon size that matches your flow (light for light days, regular for average flow, and heavy for heavy flow). Once the tampon is inside you, you shouldn’t be able to feel it. If you can feel it, though, just try pushing it inside a little farther.

When and How do I Remove Tampons?

All tampons have a string on one end that is meant to hang outside of your vagina. When you’re ready to remove the tampon, gently pull on this string to take the tampon out. If the string is missing, don’t worry! It’s physically impossible to lose the tampon inside your body. You may just have to feel around to find the string.

You should change your tampon at least every 4-6 hours. Still, you might need to change it more often depending on how heavy your flow is. It’s incredibly important that you remove tampons on time, or you could get sick with an infection called Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). The instructions in the box can tell you more about TSS.
Some bathrooms have signs telling you to throw the tampon in the trash and others say to flush it down the toilet. Be sure to follow those signs to make sure the toilet doesn’t get clogged. Once you’re finished, wash your hands.

Want to learn about other options to stay clean during your period? Check out our other posts about menstrual cups and pads!

Or for more information, take a look at the following websites:

Know about the flow – pads


The first time you get your period can feel awkward or embarrassing—but it’s actually a very normal thing, and the more you know about it, the less awkward you’ll feel.

We’re posting a three-part series called ‘Know About the Flow,’ where we’ll shed some light on sanitary products that young women can use to stay fresh and clean every month … and today is all about pads!

What are Pads?

A pad is a piece of material that is absorbent (meaning it soaks up the blood from your period) on one side and has a sticky part on the other side that you attach to your underwear. They may also be called sanitary pads, sanitary napkins or panty-liners at the store.

What Options Are There?

Pads come in all shapes, sizes and even scents. There are a lot of different types of pads to help you find the one that is perfect for you.

  • Absorbency – Pads come in many levels of absorbency, which means you can use different types based on how heavy your period is. For example, you can use a maxi-pad for heavy flow days, and a panty-liner when your period gets lighter.
  • Wings – Pads with wings will have two extra pieces of absorbent material. These ‘wings,’ as they’re called, will fold over the sides of your underwear between your legs, protecting your underwear and clothes from any leaking blood.
  • Scent – Some ladies like to wear scented pads, and others prefer no scent at all. It’s totally up to you whether you use scented or unscented pads.

How Are Pads Used?

When it’s time to put a pad on, you’ll want to be in a private area, like a bathroom. When you’re ready, open the package and remove the paper to expose the sticky area. Then just press the sticky part of the pad onto your underwear. If your pad has wings, make sure to pull the paper off all sticky areas and wrap the wings around the crotch of your underwear.

When and How Do I Remove Pads?

You should change your pad about every 4 hours, depending on how heavy your flow is. Don’t wait too long to change your pad, or it might not be able to absorb the blood. Also, the pad can start to smell if you wear it too long or if it’s soaked with a lot of blood.

When you’re ready to remove the used pad, peel it off your underwear. Wrap the pad in toilet paper and throw it in the trash. Don’t ever flush a pad because it will absorb water, swell up and clog the toilet. Wash your hands when you are done.

Want to learn about other options to stay clean during your period? Check out our other posts on menstrual cups and tampons!

Or for more information, take a look at the following websites: